Tag: conservation

Beautiful bee-eaters found in East Midlands quarry

European Bee-eater merops apiaster near Tiskanias River estuary Lesvos 11/05/10

European Bee-eater (picture not taken in Nottinghamshire).

This past week I have had some major bird envy, as just 10 minutes from my hometown in the UK, a small flock of European bee-eaters have been spotted. European bee-eaters are possibly one of the most beautiful birds you could hope to see. Found across mainland Europe and parts of Africa, they are not birds you often think of spotting in a quarry in Nottinghamshire, most excitingly the bee-eaters are showing signs that they could breed on the site. Bee-eaters live up to their name by feeding on bees and other invertebrates such as butterflies, moths and dragonflies.

There have been lots of people visiting the site to see the bee-eaters and I am so happy to see the coverage of them and of wildlife in the area. I may be a little biased, but I think the East Midlands has some of the best wildlife in the UK and can often be a little overlooked, I hope our newest arrivals stick around for the foreseeable future (at least until I am home next so I can see them!).

Beautiful barred owls

What a glorious weekend it has been, finally the sun is shining on Vancouver Island, and more excitingly I had an unexpected encounter with some beautiful barred owls. When it comes to owls my record of seeing them compared to other birdwatchers is poor at best. Quite a few times I have been tipped off on the best places to see owls, only to find empty branches and owl shaped shadows in the forest. This weekend however, was different, I was walking through a small patch of woodland, that is well known for barred owl sightings. The barred owl is a widespread, fairly common species of owl found right across the island. They are adaptable and seem very comfortable with life in our towns and cities.

I sensed my luck was in almost from the minute I entered the woods, I could hear some commotion further up the path, it sounded as though 3 or 4 hummingbirds were very upset about something in one of the trees. A good tip for finding owls and other raptors is to see how smaller birds are behaving in an area, when a raptor is present, it is very common to see a number of small birds mobbing it. As I walked down the path I could hear the hummingbirds very clearly, and after reaching the tree I was met with the unmistakable stare of an owl. A beautiful male barred owl sat on the branch, clear as day, undeterred by the hummingbirds, who were taking it in turns to dive towards it. This owl lives in an urban park, and was not fazed as people walked and cycled past.

Another tip for watching wildlife is to not only watch the wildlife but also the people around you. I saw a woman looking up the tree behind me and it turned out that she was looking at a baby barred owl. We swapped what we were looking at (she had not yet spotted the male). High in the tree sat a little fluffy blob, with their head down, trying to get a little bit of rest. I have never seen a young owl before and I enjoyed watching it scratching, yawning and generally just sitting around. Now I know where the owls can be found, I will definitely be going back to visit this family of owls that are very much at home in the middle of town!

World Whale Day

It’s World Whale Day and this is a beautiful humpback whale off Victoria, BC. We are so lucky to share our oceans worldwide with these gentle giants. Whales keep our oceans healthy. It’s vital that we do not take them for granted & fight for their protection. We can all do this by giving them space on the water, avoid places with captive whales & reduce our plastic, litter & pollution. They may be big & highly intelligent but they are not invincible in our changing world.

Bison are back in Banff

After 140 years bison have returned to Banff National Park in Alberta. As many as 30 million bison once roamed the plains, but were hunted to near extinction. The return of the bison has been managed by Parks Canada. The herd was moved from  Elk Island National Park to a remote valley in Banff, where they will be kept for 16 months under observation by staff. After this they will be fully released and free to move throughout a large area of the park.

The bison are a keystone species, one that has been missing for over a century, it is hoped that the return of the bison will have a positive impact on the national park. They are an example of the horrors and destruction that humans can cause, and many were killed to cut off food supplies and control the First Nations people, who relied heavily on the bison, their return is not only good for the ecosystem, but a symbolic gesture to try and right the wrongs of the past. I for one look forward to seeing these magnificent animals roam free in Banff National Park.

New calf for Scottish/Icelandic orcas!

Have a look at this beautiful picture from Iceland, where a new orca calf has been spotted! According to the non-profit Orca Guardians, the new calf is a member of an orca population that spends their time in Iceland and Scotland. The new Scottish/Icelandic orca calf was seen swimming close to its mother, which has been identified as orca 012 in Scotland and SN200 in Iceland. The orcas spend this time of year in Iceland and can be seen around northern Scotland in the summer. Orca Guardians is partnering with groups in Scotland, and will continue to keep track of the calf, as well as the rest of the pod. Orcas are fairly rare around the UK, with Scotland being the best place to see them.

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