Tag: conservation

Bittern numbers booming across the UK

Bittern

One of the UK’s rarest birds is booming again across the country. The beautiful bittern, was once considered extinct in the UK, but now conservationists believe their population is at a record high. Found in wetlands, the bittern is a master of camouflage, conservationists have been able to count the birds by recording their incredibly loud, foghorn like, boom call.

The bittern was at serious risk of extinction in the 1990s, the rise in their population has been because of intensive conservation efforts from a number of groups that have focused on protecting their preferred habitat. Eastern England is still the best place to see and hear bitterns, however other areas such as Somerset and the East Midlands are also good spots to find this elusive bird. Having heard bitterns myself, at Rutland Water, I will definitely attest that is a wildlife experience unlike any other in the UK, and they are a bird that is well worth making the effort to see/hear. They are a fantastic example of how conservation can work successfully and save a species that at one time seemed doomed to extinction.

Almost extinct, meeting Canada’s rarest owl!

To see some footage of the northern spotted owl and an interview with Jasmin from the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program, have a look at the video above!

Ok so I’ll start this blog by admitting that I am an owl addict, I cannot get enough; from watching barn owls in the fields of the Cowichan Valley (and in the UK at Cossington Meadows), spotting barred owls in the centre of town, ringing/banding tiny migrating saw whet owls, audio surveying for western screech owls, or seeing an all time favourite the snowy owl on logs in Boundary Bay, I seriously cannot get enough! But there is one owl I never thought I would come face to face with, the illusive and critically endangered northern spotted owl. So when I was given the opportunity through work to visit the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program in Vancouver, I jumped on the earliest ferry and headed for the mainland.

The northern spotted owl is an ancient temperate rainforest species, found on the west coast of North America, they are a highly specialised species, only found in forests that are around 150-200 years old or older. The northern spotted owl population has been decimated in recent years in BC, as much of our ancient rainforest has been lost to deforestation. Now only small pockets of ancient forest survives, and much of it is isolated and fragmented. This loss of forest has caused the wild northern spotted owl population to decline to just ten, this makes it the rarest owl in Canada and one of the most endangered species in the country.

Another issue impacting the northern spotted owl is the invasion of the barred owl, traditionally an eastern species, barred owls have made their way across the country and are now BC’s most commonly seen species. The barred owl is slightly bigger than the spotted owl and they are a generalist species, that is able to out compete the spotted owls, this has caused spotted owls to be pushed out of suitable habitat and whilst it may not be the main driver in their population decline, it certainly is not helping.

The day started with one of the strangest wildlife encounters I have ever had, on arrival to the breeding program we opened the boot of my colleague’s car and discovered a bat sitting on the lid of the boot. After getting over the initial surprise we scooped the bat into a paper bag and took it to a wildlife rehabilitation centre, we suspect it was looking for a roost somewhere and crawled into the car looking for somewhere warm. I had seen this firsthand with mice, but never with bats! The bat was fine and they will find it a much better place to roost!

Anyway back at the breeding program we met with the lovely employees who work with the northern spotted owls at their facility. They gave us a fantastic tour, showing us the work they are doing to breed and eventually release northern spotted owls back into the ancient forests of BC. The program currently has 20 owls, the initial work has been to learn how to effectively breed the owls. Northern spotted owls are not simple breeders, they are a long living species that does not start reproduction for many years, their eggs take 88 hours to hatch (most birds take half that) and are very susceptible to infection. The next stage of the program is to start reintroductions, with the overall goal to reach a population of 200 wild northern spotted owls in BC.

The highlight of the tour was of course seeing the owls themselves. We walked through the absolute pouring rain to the aviary to see a 23 year old male. The large aviaries are full of branches with many places for a spotted owl to hide, but this owl was pretty simple, he was sat at the back under some shelter, which was a very sensible decision! It was incredible to come face to face with a spotted owl, what was so striking was their markings, not only were the spots very clear, but their darker browns and patterned feathers fit so perfectly with the darker and often gloomy BC forest. It was fascinating to compare them with the owls we mostly see in the forest, the barred owl, their lighter colouring often sticks out in the forest, and this is because they are an eastern species and are more adapted to lighter deciduous forests found there. It was a unique opportunity to directly compare a native and non-native species, and see how the native species truly fits within the ecosystem.

The Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program is doing incredible work to try and save such a stunning species that belongs in the ancient forests of British Columbia. It was such a privilege to get to see such an endangered bird, and to learn about the conservation techniques that are being implemented to ensure that they do not become extinct. I wanted to say a huge thanks to the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program for the work they do and for letting us tour their facility. Without groups of people like them, northern spotted owls would already be extinct in Canada, but hopefully with their hard work we will one day see a sustainable population back in our ancient forests.

To learn more about the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program, follow them on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/nsobreedingp…

NAAEE virtual conference & panel in Washington DC

Last month I had the pleasure of being selected as one of the North American Association for Environmental Education’s 30 under 30. If that was not enough, I was also invited to speak on a panel,  with three other amazing youth environmental educators, so I packed my bags and headed for Washington DC.

I was only in Washington for two days, but on the first day we were given the chance to explore the city and meet with the other participants. As well as the warm weather and beautiful architecture in Washington, one of my highlights  was seeing my first ever monarch butterfly, the large orange butterfly glided right over me, meaning I had a perfect view of it, monarchs are an iconic species and one I had not expected to see on this trip! Another eastern species that I had wanted to see showed up outside the Natural History Museum, the unmistakable blue jay!

On the day of the panel we spent the morning at an Audubon centre on the outskirts of Washington. Surrounded by thick deciduous woodland the area was filled with birds, from cardinals to nuthatches and an array of singing warblers, it was a birders paradise! We were there filming a few interviews about the work we do and about youth in environmental education.

The panel discussion gave myself and other young environmental educators the chance to discuss some of the challenges we face in our field and to highlight and share the work we do in our communities. I loved being able to share the work I and many others are doing across British Columbia. I was amazed by the overwhelming positive response I got for my work. It is rare for young environmental educators from different areas to meet up and share their experiences in environmental education and it was fascinating to learn about what environmental education looks like across North and South America. What really stuck with me was that many of the challenges we face in British Columbia and Canada, are very similar to those faced by other educators across the continent. It was also inspiring to see the number of youth that are involved in environmental education and learning about the incredible work young people are doing to inspire and provide opportunities for the next generation to connect with the environment around them.

The panel was an hour-long discussion, answering pre-set questions about our work and then taking some questions from the audience. At the end we received an award for outstanding leadership in environmental education, which I am so grateful to receive.

The trip was a fantastic chance to connect with others working in the environmental education field, promote the amazing work taking place in BC, but also to learn and discuss ways we can improve environmental education in our local areas. I left the conference with a fresh perspective and full of optimism. I truly believe that environmental education is vital if we are to have healthy and thriving ecosystems and that by actively engaging young people from all backgrounds in the environmental field we can create a better society.

I wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone at NAAEE for their amazing work and for recognising young people, as well as organising the event. Another huge shout out to my panel buddies Leandra, Lula, Ankita and Danni, I had never spoken on a panel before, so being able to share it with such remarkable and inspiring people made the whole thing such a fantastic experience.

To learn more about the work youth are doing in the environmental field, see all 30 of us in the link below:

https://naaee.org/our-work/programs/ee-30-under-30

Endangered southern resident orcas get 200-metre protection zone from boats

Canadian Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc announced today that new regulations would be put in place to ensure that boats will have to remain 200-metres from southern resident orcas. Currently the guidelines in Canada are that boats should be 100-metres away from marine life, however this is just a guide, not a requirement. In the USA the law is stricter, boats are required to keep 200-metres away from orcas, something that now the Canadian government will enforce.

This news has been welcomed by orca conservationists, and personally I am thrilled, this topic was the subject of my dissertation. I looked at the impact boat distance had on southern resident orca behaviour, comparing the difference in distance across the Canada-USA border. I found that the extra 100 metres the orcas are given in the USA had a positive impact on their behaviour. As well as this, there was a lot of confusion from boaters about the regulations in the orcas’ habitat, the Salish Sea. The international border runs through the sea meaning that two different regulations are in place, leading to confusion and often illegal activity, particularly with boaters getting too close to orcas in American waters.

I am happy to see the Canadian government take a first step towards conserving the endangered whales, however there is a real need for more action. A study published today shows a 25% chance that these iconic whales could be lost within the next 100 years. With appropriate and resolute actions, however, this risk of extinction could be significantly reduced. It found that increasing the abundance of their main prey, chinook salmon, and reducing vessel disturbance further are the key areas that now have to be implemented. I encourage anyone reading, who is a Canadian citizen/resident to speak with their MP about the need for greater protections for endangered orcas in Canada.

Beautiful bee-eaters found in East Midlands quarry

European Bee-eater merops apiaster near Tiskanias River estuary Lesvos 11/05/10

European Bee-eater (picture not taken in Nottinghamshire).

This past week I have had some major bird envy, as just 10 minutes from my hometown in the UK, a small flock of European bee-eaters have been spotted. European bee-eaters are possibly one of the most beautiful birds you could hope to see. Found across mainland Europe and parts of Africa, they are not birds you often think of spotting in a quarry in Nottinghamshire, most excitingly the bee-eaters are showing signs that they could breed on the site. Bee-eaters live up to their name by feeding on bees and other invertebrates such as butterflies, moths and dragonflies.

There have been lots of people visiting the site to see the bee-eaters and I am so happy to see the coverage of them and of wildlife in the area. I may be a little biased, but I think the East Midlands has some of the best wildlife in the UK and can often be a little overlooked, I hope our newest arrivals stick around for the foreseeable future (at least until I am home next so I can see them!).

Beautiful barred owls

What a glorious weekend it has been, finally the sun is shining on Vancouver Island, and more excitingly I had an unexpected encounter with some beautiful barred owls. When it comes to owls my record of seeing them compared to other birdwatchers is poor at best. Quite a few times I have been tipped off on the best places to see owls, only to find empty branches and owl shaped shadows in the forest. This weekend however, was different, I was walking through a small patch of woodland, that is well known for barred owl sightings. The barred owl is a widespread, fairly common species of owl found right across the island. They are adaptable and seem very comfortable with life in our towns and cities.

I sensed my luck was in almost from the minute I entered the woods, I could hear some commotion further up the path, it sounded as though 3 or 4 hummingbirds were very upset about something in one of the trees. A good tip for finding owls and other raptors is to see how smaller birds are behaving in an area, when a raptor is present, it is very common to see a number of small birds mobbing it. As I walked down the path I could hear the hummingbirds very clearly, and after reaching the tree I was met with the unmistakable stare of an owl. A beautiful male barred owl sat on the branch, clear as day, undeterred by the hummingbirds, who were taking it in turns to dive towards it. This owl lives in an urban park, and was not fazed as people walked and cycled past.

Another tip for watching wildlife is to not only watch the wildlife but also the people around you. I saw a woman looking up the tree behind me and it turned out that she was looking at a baby barred owl. We swapped what we were looking at (she had not yet spotted the male). High in the tree sat a little fluffy blob, with their head down, trying to get a little bit of rest. I have never seen a young owl before and I enjoyed watching it scratching, yawning and generally just sitting around. Now I know where the owls can be found, I will definitely be going back to visit this family of owls that are very much at home in the middle of town!

World Whale Day

It’s World Whale Day and this is a beautiful humpback whale off Victoria, BC. We are so lucky to share our oceans worldwide with these gentle giants. Whales keep our oceans healthy. It’s vital that we do not take them for granted & fight for their protection. We can all do this by giving them space on the water, avoid places with captive whales & reduce our plastic, litter & pollution. They may be big & highly intelligent but they are not invincible in our changing world.

Bison are back in Banff

After 140 years bison have returned to Banff National Park in Alberta. As many as 30 million bison once roamed the plains, but were hunted to near extinction. The return of the bison has been managed by Parks Canada. The herd was moved from  Elk Island National Park to a remote valley in Banff, where they will be kept for 16 months under observation by staff. After this they will be fully released and free to move throughout a large area of the park.

The bison are a keystone species, one that has been missing for over a century, it is hoped that the return of the bison will have a positive impact on the national park. They are an example of the horrors and destruction that humans can cause, and many were killed to cut off food supplies and control the First Nations people, who relied heavily on the bison, their return is not only good for the ecosystem, but a symbolic gesture to try and right the wrongs of the past. I for one look forward to seeing these magnificent animals roam free in Banff National Park.

New calf for Scottish/Icelandic orcas!

Have a look at this beautiful picture from Iceland, where a new orca calf has been spotted! According to the non-profit Orca Guardians, the new calf is a member of an orca population that spends their time in Iceland and Scotland. The new Scottish/Icelandic orca calf was seen swimming close to its mother, which has been identified as orca 012 in Scotland and SN200 in Iceland. The orcas spend this time of year in Iceland and can be seen around northern Scotland in the summer. Orca Guardians is partnering with groups in Scotland, and will continue to keep track of the calf, as well as the rest of the pod. Orcas are fairly rare around the UK, with Scotland being the best place to see them.

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